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22990

CHILDREN TREATED FOR SEVERE ACUTE MALNUTRITION (SAM)

20744

PATIENTS TREATED FOR MALARIA

4054

HOSPITALISATIONS

POPULATION

11,600,000
million

INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY RATE

89
deaths per 1,000 children

MATERNAL MORTALITY RATE

856
deaths per 100,000 births

country context

The security situation in Chad has only recently begun to stabilise after a decade of internal conflict. Now the country is experiencing an influx of refugees and asylum seekers escaping violence in neighbouring Central African Republic (CAR), Nigeria, and Sudan.
Like most countries in the Sahel, Chad faces serious food insecurity.

According to the latest SMART survey (2015), SAM rates have reached 2.8% in N’Djamena and 2.2% in Ngouri. Healthcare cover in Chad is extremely limited by drastic shortages of medical personnel outside N’Djamena. Most families cannot afford what reduced care is available.

The country has recurring outbreaks of cholera, malaria, and measles.

our partners

In 2012, ALIMA partnered with Alerte Santé, a Chadian medical NGO. Alerte Santé promotes the health of Chadians by providing medical assistance as well as material and human aide to existing health structures.

Operations

In Chad, ALIMA and Alerte Santé are pursuing a medical and nutritional treatment programme for children below the age of five in Ngouri (Lac Region) and N’Djamena. Different treatments are offered according to the severity of malnutrition and the child’s general state of health. In cases of severe acute malnutrition without medical complication, the child is treated as an outpatient with ready-to-use therapeutic foods, a treatment plan, and medical surveillance every two weeks. Hospitalisation occurs if the child’s condition does not improve or if an associated medical complication develops.

In 2015, ALIMA and Alerte Santé treated 22,990 malnourished children and 20,744 patients, mostly children, suffering from malaria.

In addition, a research project, DIDIMAS, was launched at the end of 2015. DIDIMAS will study the causes of diarrhoea in severely malnourished children with complications, with a focus on infectious causes.

The project uses bioFire, a clinical molecular biology diagnostic device , to describe the prevalence of conditions associated with diarrhoea in children hospitalised in the Department of Therapeutic Nutrition at the China-Chad Friendship Hospital.