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    Burkina Faso

    Burkina Faso

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    4622

    MALNOURISHED CHILDREN TREATED

    55083

    MOTHERS TRAINED TO SCREEN MALNUTRITION

    109869

    PATIENTS RECEIVED PREVENTIVE TREATMENT AGAINST MALARIA

    POPULATION

    18,900,000

    millions


    MATERNAL MORTALITY RATE

    89

    deaths per 100,000 births


    INFANT AND CHILD MORTALITY RATE

    371

    deaths per 1,000 births

    COUNTRY CONTEXT

    Burkina Faso is located in a high-risk zone for epidemics (meningitis, measles) and has a high prevalence of malaria. It continues to be chronically affected by severe food and nutritional crises. In 2015, the prevalence of global acute malnutrition was 10.4% and severe acute malnutrition 2.2%.


    The main causes of infant and child mortality are malaria, respiratory infections and diarrhea, often associated with malnutrition.

    OUR PARTNERS

    In 2012 ALIMA began working with Keoogo, an organization that works on behalf of street children, and SOS Médecins, a medical NGO that specializes in responding to medical emergencies, treating HIV/AIDS, and providing healthcare in prisons.


    This partnership supports the Ministry of Health, offering regular training sessions to make long-term improvements to quality of care.

    OPERATIONS

    ALIMA, Keoogo, and SOS Médecins together support nearly 80 health centers in the Yako health district (Nord) and Boussé (Plateau-Central). Community health workers regularly screen children as part of mass campaigns, and refer them to health centers. Malnourished children are generally treated as outpatients, although children in the most serious condition are taken to hospital.


    In Boussé, ALIMA/Keoogo/SOS Médecins teams help the district implement seasonal malaria chemoprevention campaigns, providing prophylaxis to 30,000 children aged 3–59 months. This action means there is a significant reduction in the number of both uncomplicated and severe cases of the disease.


    People in local communities, particularly mothers, are taught anti-malaria hygiene and prevention measures. They are also taught about malnutrition, including how to recognize malnutrition in their own children by measuring their mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC).


    In Yako, ALIMA collaborated with the University of Copenhagen and Médecins Sans Frontières on an operational research project comparing the efficacy of new ready-to-use supplementary foods to treat moderate acute malnutrition in children aged 6–23 months. The results of this research, which began in 2013, will be published in 2016.

    The TreatFood project is funded by the European Civil Protection and Humanitarian Aid Operations (ECHO).